Trafalgar Square

Trafalgar Square

Heart of England, this is how Londoners call Trafalgar Square. Perhaps pedantic Englishmen know that Trafalgar Square is the geographical centre of the capital. History of the square is inseparably associated with many significant events of the country - the victorious and even tragic ones. It is the true centre of London where locals congregate for anything from communal open-air cinema, Christmas, European and Chinese New Year celebrations with the principle Christmas tree.

Major landmark of the square commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar, a British naval victory at Cape Trafalgar, a 46-meter column with the statue of legendary Admiral Horatio Nelson. A number of commemorative statues and sculptures occupy the square. The Fourth Plinth, left empty since 1840, has been host to contemporary art since 1999 (a long-term project of the town hall). In March 2015 the shocking monument - Gift Horse designed by an American artist Hans Haacke was installed on the fourth plinth. It is a model of a horse's skeleton with a live display of the London Stock Exchange. In 2016 another innovative sculpture - Really Good - was installed on the fourth plinth, it was a seven-meter sculpture of the hand with specifically long thumb. This place keeps memories of executions of regicides, public punishments of disagreeable at the whipping post. On the south side, next to Nelson's monument, on the site of the original Charing Cross, is a bronze equestrian statue of Charles I. It commemorates his execution, the result of the English revolution. Every year, on January 30, flowers are laid at the monument.

Trafalgar Square is located on the cross-roads of the Strand Street, Whitehall and Mall and can be a start of the walk leading to the residence of the Prime Minister or the royal St James's Palace. Very close to the square is London National Gallery and church St Martin-in-the-Fields. Area next to the gallery is full of vitality - there you will certainly see performances of street artists - dancers, acrobats or signers, all find their own audience and appreciation from the numerous tourists, sometimes even despite the tiredness or bad weather. The place is not simply the heart of England but has a very special charm. Stay there for a while, look at the fountains, feel the energy and you will certainly want to return here some day!

Address: Trafalgar Square
How to reach: tube Embankment, Charing Cross; bus 3, 6, 9, 11, 12, 15, 23, 24, 29, 87, 88, 91, 139, 159, 176, N5, N20, N29, N41, N279.
Coordinates: 51.50807, -0.12807